As most people already know, I take the presently unpopular position that mechanical instruments have no place in Christian worship. However, every time I write on this subject someone inevitably asks, “What about the instruments in the Old Testament?” That is a great question. As the argument goes: If God authorized instruments under the Old Law, then without some kind of New Testament prohibition against them, why would anyone teach they are not allowed today? I believe if the average person understood the context in which instruments were authorized in the Old Testament, they would understand why they have no place in the church.

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I hear people say things like, “I could feel God’s presence at that church.” Or, “I could really feel God’s presence while we were singing that song.” There is certainly no doubt a person can have a fantastic emotional response to a song or to the friendliness of a church, but I don’t believe God Himself is experienced in this way. Furthermore, trying to discern the will of God based on whether or not you “feel His presence” seems a very dangerous way to live your life. Here are some things I hope you will consider:

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There are several denominations that practice “infant baptism.” While there are several reasons I can appreciate the motivation behind this practice, it certainly finds no justification in Scripture. It is simply not biblical to baptize an infant.

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Many people today treat the Bible as a practical guide to life. They see Scripture as a divine self-help book. “If I follow the teachings in this book,” they say to themselves, “I will have the job I want, the relationships I want, money in the bank, and great health.” But I’m afraid, if you read the Bible in that way, you’re missing the point entirely.

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When confronted with their sins, it’s not uncommon to hear people say, “Yeah, but God knows my heart.” I usually take this to mean, “What I’m doing might be wrong, but in my heart, I’m a good person. God knows that. So I don’t think He will hold me accountable for my actions.” These folks obviously believe in God and believe in sin, but they believe that having a “good heart” is justification for their sin. God says that’s not true.

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I often see Christians post on social media, “God is good” and, to be honest, it often makes me cringe. I don’t cringe because I disagree with the statement. Obviously, God is good! And I don’t cringe because someone is giving glory to God. I’m so glad they are giving glory to God.

Here is why I cringe…

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How to be the Church of Grace

Wes  —  January 14, 2015

The word “grace” appears over 100 times in the New Testament. One could easily say that grace is one of the most dominant themes of the New Testament. The apostle John began his gospel account by saying, “The law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ” (John 1:17). Therefore, it is only right for Christ’s church to be known as a people of grace. Or, in other words, the church of Christ should be the church of grace.

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When unbelievers look at the Christian lifestyle, they often comment on how dull, boring, and unenjoyable it must be. They see us as living a deprived life, under an archaic set of rules that keep us from having any fun. But in reality, nothing could be further from the truth. There are far more reasons to celebrate life as a believer than as an unbeliever. Here are some reasons why believers can enjoy life more than unbelievers.

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I regret that I have written several posts explaining why I am opposed to the use of mechanical instruments in worship, but I have never written a positive post, simply explaining why I believe in congregational a cappella singing. So in this post, I would like to explain – in purely positive terms – why I believe in congregational a cappella singing.

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In my childhood, I argued about Christmas a lot. “You know,” I would say in a matter-of-fact tone, “Jesus wasn’t really born on December 25th.” I relished correcting people about the inaccuracies of their religious holiday and their little nativity scenes. Since then I’ve learned, you can be right and be wrong at the same time. I was right, Jesus most likely was not born on December 25th, but I was dead wrong for thinking that arguing that point was somehow pleasing to God.

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